British Rule in the context of Hazara

British Rule in the context of Hazara

Major James Abbott
Major James Abbott

After the First Sikh War, under the terms of the Treaty of Lahore, the zone was administered by Major James Abbott. Abbott figured out how to secure and placate the region inside a year. Amid the Second Sikh War Abbott and his men were cut off by the Sikh armed force from provisions and fortifications from whatever is left of the British Army, yet could keep up their position. James abbott was helped by few understood identities of that time most conspicuously Qazi Abdul Ghafar, a man of monstrous vitality, who rendered profitable support of Major Abbott in the basic years of 1847-49. He was made Tahsildar in Hazara.

 

By 1849, the British had picked up control of all of Hazara. Be that as it may, the western Pashtun tribes were once in a while defiant. These tribes incorporated the families of Allai, Batagram in the Nandhiar valley, and The Black Mountain (Tor Ghar) Tribes. The British sent numerous undertakings against these tribes to smash a few uprisings in the vicinity of 1852 and the 1920s.

 

The British isolated Hazara District into three Tehsils (regulatory subdivisions): Mansehra, Abbottabad, and Haripur and attached it to the Punjab. In 1901, when the North-West Frontier Province (now Khyber Pakhtunkhwa) was framed, Hazara was isolated from Punjab and made a part of NWFP. All through their control in Mansehra, the British met savage resistance from the nearby tribes and announced military law. In the meantime, the general population of Mansehra’s numerous towns to a great extent represented themselves. A considerable lot of Mansehra’s natives joined the Khilafat development and a few were detained for this.

 

From the 1930s onwards, the general population of Hazara step by step ended up noticeably dynamic in the opportunity development for a free Pakistan under the dynamic authority of prestigious All India Muslim League pioneers, for example, Khan Bahadur Jalal Khan a.k.a. Jalal Baba, Khan Sb Abdul Majid Khan Tarin, OBE, of Talokar (1877–1939), who remained a dear companion and partner of Sahibzada Sir Abdul Qayyum Khan, and an early individual from the (at that point) Frontier Legislative Assembly, and others. Indeed, even before the All-India Muslim League began its development for Pakistan in 1937, after the notable Lucknow Session of October that year, the Hazara Muslim League was appropriately framed and met at the living arrangement of Noor-Ud-Din Qureshi in Abbottabad in 1936. In this meeting the pioneers of the All-India Muslim League, Nawab Bhadur Yar Jang, Mulana Shoukat Ali, Hamid Badayuni and others, originated from India. The nearby individuals joined the development in expansive numbers. In Mansehra around the same time the Muslim League was sorted out by Ali Gohar Khan and Hakim Abdul Karim, who were chosen the principal president and general secretary of the tehsil Mansehra Muslim League. Amid the last period of the development for the formation of Pakistan, Capt Sardar Zain Muhammad Khan, OBI, and Khan Bahadur Jalal-ud-clamor Jalal Baba crushed their Congress equals in the decisions of 1946 from their individual rustic and urban Constituencies, and politically steered the All India Congress from the area. Because of dynamic association of Jalal Baba, the Muslim League caught all the Hazara District get together seats aside from one in the pivotal decisions of 1946 against the than ANP who needed to agree with India. In the Delhi Convention of Muslim League parliamentarians led by Quaid-e-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah, which at long last voted in favor of the division of India and the formation of Pakistan, Capt Sardar Zain Muhammad Khan(Chief of Karlal Tribe and father of Late Sardar M-Aslam Senetor of PPP and its establishing part) spoke to Hazara. These Muslim League Leaders were likewise ready to prepare the general population of this zone for the choice for the production of Pakistan.

 

At some point before the season of Partition/Independence, Nawab Sir Muhammad Farid Khan of Amb State grew great relations with Jinnah and Nawabzada Liaqat Ali Khan. His commitments to the Pakistan development have been recognized in letters from Jinnah.

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